Hotbed 2018 is on its way!

Save the dates for this year's Hotbed New Writing Theatre Festival: Friday 6th and Saturday 7th July.

This year, we are excited to welcome back the internationally acclaimed Irish theatre company, Fishamble, with their Olivier Award-winning production of Silent and their stunning new piece of work Underneath

We will also have Maria Montague with us again, who was one of our young writers in 2016. This year, she is bringing a production that marks the English-language premiere of Maklena, translated from the Ukrainian original.  

Other events include a reading of a new play by Channel 4 Writer in Residence, Janice Okoh, a workshop by Fraser Grace and a an exciting reworking of Antigone by local theatre company, Acting Now.

The Full Hotbed Programme will be on sale via the Cambridge Junction Box Office next week.  

2016 Hotbed Archive

Ross and Rachel

ROSS AND RACHEL

One of the most affecting pieces I saw at the Hotbed festival yesterday was James Fritz’s play Ross and Rachel - a one-hander that couldn’t exactly be described as a monologue as it had multiple characters, all performed continuously by actor Molly Vevers; part anecdote, part stream of consciousness. The play itself dealt with themes of love, death and marriage – at times funny, at times cynical, in places, incredibly dark. It was masterfully written, masterfully acted and lingered in my mind long after the lights had gone down. 

Joe Waters I Menagerie Volunteer

A blog About Flog

A Blog About Flog

Another performance I’ve seen at Hotbed today is Flog – a darkly comic piece by Josie Dale Jones (who has been creating it as part of the Menagerie Young Writer's Scheme) dealing with a certain brand of Silicon Valley techno-idealism that is beginning to gain sway in the world – the idea that technology can enhance our bodies and minds, make us immortal, make us happier, augment our brains etc. The piece explores the ludicrous and more than slightly sinister element of this idea through the lens of capitalist idea-mongering that we see all the time in the world around us, revealing unpleasant truths about the characters, ourselves and the human isolationist concept of making our own existences bespoke and effort free, without any need for thinking and how dangerous and, frankly, undesirable this can be!

Joe Waters I Menagerie Volunteer

Volunteering and Plays!

Volunteering and Plays!

Only three or so hours into volunteering at the Hotbed Festival, in between various trips to Sainsbury’s to fetch sweets and various pastry related items to put out in the foyer, I have already seen two interesting, thought-provoking and , when they wanted to be, humorous pieces of new writing.

The first was You, Me and The Spanish Civil War, a monologue by Marina Pallares-Elias telling the true story of her father who was leader of the Spanish communist party in the early 70s. His story reflects the wider political events that were occurring at that time, in Spain, during the final days of Franco’s rule, shedding light on an area of history that is relatively unknown to most of the world. Like many significant historical events, while a lot has been written about the Spanish Civil War, relatively little has dealt with the 40 years of Fascist dictatorship that followed and the tensions that still exist today (a reason that, while this piece has been making its way round various living rooms in Cambridge, it has not yet been performed in Spain). The piece itself served to highlight the personal stories within this period which still remain relatively untold and, hopefully, now, through the ongoing development and dissemination of this performance, will gain a new audience, one it certainly deserves.

Joe Waters I Menagerie Volunteer